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Accelerating Student Learning and Motivation in Your U.S. History Classroom

Links to History Resources on the Web

Home
Why Study U.S. History?
Using the Standards
Standardized Exams
Developing Themes in U.S. History
Historical Stories and Unit Hooks
Using Primary Sources in the Classroom
General Strategies
Alternative Assessments
Rubrics and Scaffolds
Long Term Projects
Additional Resources
Kevin Williams: Contact and Information

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Historical Resources on the Web

 

Images and Documents

1.  Area 3 History and Cultures Project

  • Contains lessons that use a wide array of primary sources.  The best thing is that the documents are very short and can be used with a wide array of classes. 
  • Contains thousands of images that you can download to use in your Powerpoints

2.  Google Image Search – when in doubt, type in a very specific search into Google and see what happens.

 

3.  American Treasures of the Library of Congress – great collection of images of RARE document, images, etc.  This is an ideal site for early American history – you won’t find this stuff anywhere else.  Check out special presentations for other exhibits - for example, right now there is an amazing Historical Inaugural collection.

 

Treasures of Congress – Different from the site above.  This one is organized chronologically by topic, and has several images and a historical review for each time period.  Great spot to get some early images from U.S. History (1787-1977)  that are high in quality.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibit_hall/treasures_of_congress/site.html

 

 

4.  Making Sense of Documents – Rich site in which historians lead you through the process of using various forms of primary evidence.  Each site also has examples that you could use.

 

Authentic History – Great resource for music from the 20th century.  Music is played in streaming format – NOT DOWNLOADABLE.  You’ll need to use a recorder (I’ve used Total Recorder, but many new Dell Computers come with a program called Creative – it has many parts to it, but one is a recorder called Creative Recorder

 

5.  From Revolution to Reconstruction, And What Happened Afterwards  – Well organized, easy to use, numerous documents from throughout American History (including pre-settlement)

 

6.  Teaching With Documents – this site is hosted by NARA (National Archives and Records Administration) and is part of their Digital Classroom program.  While this doesn’t contain a wide array of documents like earlier sources, this site also contains detailed lesson plans!

 

7.  Famous Trials – Great site for information about famous trials.  Boston Massacre Trial, Susan B. Anthony, Black Sox Trial, Scopes Monkey Trial, and Sacco and Vanzetti Trial are all highlights. All trial lessons in the handbook came from this site.

 

8.  Fraker, Alan.  Doing the DBQ:  Advanced Placement U.S. History Examination - An excellent source for document based questions – focused questions in which all the documents play some part in answering the question.  Also good because the documents have already been excerpted.

 

9.  Internet Archive:  Moving Image Archive.  Amazing collection of films and music that are PUBLIC DOMAIN.  The Prelinger Archive has an excellent collection of educational films from the 20th century.

10.  Garner, Joe.  Stay Tuned:  Television’s Unforgettable Moments. (Andrews McMeel Publishing:  Kansas City).  Excellent collection of television, news and sports moments.  Includes a DVD and CDs along with a book for each event.

Books
 

Boller Jr., Paul. Presidential Anecdotes. Rev. Ed. New York:  Oxford University Press, 1996.

 

Hall, Kermit. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

 

Loewen, James. Lies My Teacher Told Me. New York: New Press, 1995.

Monk, Linda. The Words We Live By. New York: The Stonesong Press, 2003.

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Political Cartoons, Film, and Music on the Web
 

1.  Political Prints at Harpweek.com - amazing collection of political cartoons from 1776-1876 from Harper's Weekly.  The great thing is that this website provides explanations of all cartoons so you can be prepared!!

 

2.  Herb Block’s Editorial Cartoons – from the New Deal to the election of 2000.  This collection is hard to beat.  Both websites contain his cartoons, although the first one has more!

Another Herb Block site can be found at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/swann/hbgift/

 

3.  Doctor Seuss Went To War – collection of political cartoons drawn by Dr. Seuss during WWII.  There is a book as well, but this site is an easy way to find all the cartoons.

 

4.  Internet Archive:  Prelinger Archives.  Amazing collection of films and music that are PUBLIC DOMAIN.  The Prelinger Archive has an excellent collection of educational films from the 20th century.

 

5. Annenberg/CPB - Social Studies – This site contains many PBS programs 

online.  Once you register, you can access Video On Demand (VOD), which

allows you to play any video series offered by the website in realtime. 

 

6.  American Memory Collection (Motion Picture and Television Reading Room) – excellent collection of films from the early to mid 20th century.  You can view these, but you CANNOT DOWNLOAD.

 

7.  Authentic History – Great resource for music from the 20th century.  Music is played in streaming format – NOT DOWNLOADABLE.  You’ll need to use a recorder (I’ve used Total Recorder, but many new Dell Computers come with a program called Creative – it has many parts to it, but one is a recorder called Creative Recorder

 

  

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Technology Resources on the Web
 
1.  Conforums.com - This site allows you to run message boards that are completely protected from the outside.  You can choose to have certain boards be viewed only by certain classes.  Other boards can be viewed by all your students as a way of communicating and discussing current events.  These boards are free!!  There are a lot of pop-ups, but it’s all worth it.
 
 
2.  Audacity - If you’re interested in having your own software so you can capture streaming sound, follow this link.  This software, Audacity, is free and incredibly easy to use:
 
You may want to download the free MP3 converter at the same website.  Just follow this link: http://mitiok.cjb.net/

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3.  WM Recorder - If your district blocks the playing of live video, then you can purchase streaming video recording software which allows you to record streaming video.

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